Notes on a meeting

A couple of guys in white collared shirts are having a laugh and a cigarette on the footpath, the adjacent building casting cool shadows in the early evening summer sun. I walk up, make some small talk and ask how their day is going. I’ve long since quit tobacco, so I don’t linger and head inside.

The group meets for one hour each week in a small room at the back of a local-government administered community facility. There are three core members of the group who have taken on the responsibility of keeping the doors open each week. This requires a number of tasks to be completed, including picking up the keys and opening up, welcoming newcomers and visitors, chairing the meeting, bringing and setting up the tea, coffee, biscuits, literature, collecting donations, putting out the chairs and, later, packing up.

People who attend the meetings always help out where they can, for example washing up coffee cups and stacking chairs. In the old days, the ashtrays had to be emptied too. These are what we call in AA ‘esteemable acts’: actions that build one’s self confidence and self-esteem through being useful to other human beings. Esteemable acts also include smiling and showing interest in other people, rather than ignoring them.

AA understands that when we value ourselves, we are less likely to drink or to behave in ways that are unhealthy to ourselves and others. In short: doing esteemable acts, like saying g’day to someone new and offering to make them a cuppa, helps us stay well. So, that’s what I do.

How do you take it?

White with one thanks.

Biscuit?

Members drift in and out of groups. Sometimes, there are more members of this group than there are service jobs to fill. At other times, such as now, there is little redundancy and therefore more responsibility is needed to be taken on by the three members. In practice, these are simple tasks. But the important thing is that they get done, by someone.

There are other members of the group who have drifted away. Some may have drunk again. Some may have moved to another town, or just to the other side of this one. Some may have even got the shits and developed a resentment against the group. It happens.

It is an open meeting, which means that anyone is welcome to come along and listen. However, only those people who identify as an alcoholic are called on to share. As the group is self-supporting in line with AA’s traditions, only those who identify as alcoholics are asked to give coin donations at the end of the meeting. If a friend or family member comes along in support of a newcomer, for example, it is considered inappropriate for them to contribute a coin to the basket at the close of the meeting.

Usually, no more than 15 people attend this particular meeting, which means that everyone gets a chance to share for a few minutes (going on for more than 5 minutes in a full room is considered poor form).

Some groups take a tougher line than others on asking addicts to share, although most of the addicts that come to this meeting identify primarily as alcoholics and are always called on to share.

We start with introductions, sitting in a circle.

The famous ‘hello I’m … and I’m an alcoholic’.

Some add their length of sobriety in years or months or days. Others mention where their home group is located and when.

This particular meeting starts with a reading from AA literature and then members get to riff on the topic or to share their experience, strength and hope in recovery. Usually it’s a bit of both.

Once everyone has had a chance to share, the meeting is closed with a reminder of AA’s principle of anonymity. The basket is passed and each person throws in a few coins, some gold.

We join hands, as the embodiment of strength in unity, and recite the serenity prayer.*

There are some announcements, including one about an upcoming camping weekend away. Coffee cups are washed, chairs are stacked. Hands are shaken, hugs given, laughs had. Phone numbers are exchanged. Some friends head off for another coffee.

The shadows have lengthened as the butane flames lick paper and tobacco.

I leave feeling better than before. More level. The right size. Just for today.

* ‘God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change; courage to change the things I can; and wisdom to know the difference.’ Personally, I prefer meetings that close with the secular Responsibility Pledge: ‘I am responsible. When anyone, anywhere reaches out for help, I want the hand of A.A. always to be there. And for that, I am responsible.’

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